wing-t

Utilizing the Rocket Toss

For some Wing-T teams (as well as some Spread-T teams), when it comes to attacking the edge the Rocket Toss is going to a better option than the Speed Sweep or the Buck Sweep.  Rocket will be better for teams that are undersized up front, play against defensive ends that are of a high caliber and for teams that will never get into any type of zone blocking.  Why is this so?  Well, in the Buck Sweep, the ball carrier is going to get the ball after a short high motion, after the QB has faked to the fullback.  He then will stretch the edge and must rely on the down block of a wing back on a defensive end.  As far as plays go for the Wing-T, it is rather slow hitting.  Not to mention all the moving parts like having two pulling guards on linebackers in space.  For Speed Sweep, the ball carrier is going to receive the football directly behind the center, and be on the edge in a few steps.  This is great for creating a stretch of the defense and opening up creases to cut up inside of.  With the Rocket Toss, the ball carrier is going to get the ball in full stride behind the play side wing back, that means there is no need to block any down lineman inside of your offensive tackle! When the ball carrier gets the ball, he is already on the edge, the only other play in football that can rival the way Rocket stretches the entire field is going to be the bubble pass.  The defense must defend the entire width of the field with rocket toss.  Best of all, the rocket motion matches up with belly, trap, counter, sally, the option series and all the play action passes!

Here is a look at some examples of the Rocket Toss in action:

While you can run the Speed Sweep and the Rocket in the same offense, it will be more beneficial to choose just one, and marry it.  So, that said, why would we choose to base the offense off the Rocket Toss in place of Speed Sweep or Buck Sweep?

  1. Undersized Offensive Line – The nature of the play means we can eliminate the need for blocking any down lineman inside of the tackle. In fact, offensive tackles will not have to block a five tech in the traditional sense either.  He will be racing the defensive lineman to the sideline and looking to turn up inside (we will detail this later). This means that we do not need to control bigger and more athletic defensive lineman, and we can use our smaller size to our advantage. It also takes the most common defensive technique (squeeze and scrape) and turns it into something that will hurt the defense!
  2. The Defense has to Cheat – you will find that in order for the defense to protect the flank, somebody is going to have to cheat. A DL will have to fly out on the snap, a linebacker will have to vacate the box or a safety will need to come flying down field.  All of these things open up other aspects of the offense allowing you to call the appropriate response.
  3. Stretches the Entire Field – there is only one other play that can stretch the entire field like the Rocket Toss does. This makes it extremely easy to identify which defenders are responsible for run support and contain.
  4. Extremely Easy to Teach – For the most part, the entire offense has just one rule, “Rip and Run”. This is a very easy technique to teach and only requires desire by the blockers.  They are going to “race” the defender to the sideline and rip up field once they get their hat on the play side number.

Rules for Rocket Toss

X: The wide receivers to the play side are going to be responsible for blocking the corner backs.  They will close the distance between themselves and the corner as quickly as possible.  Just before reaching the corner they will break down and “chatter” their feet so they can engage the corner without losing him in space.  This does not have to be a devastating block.  The blocker just needs to get on the corner and take him where he wants to go.  Once the defender picks a side, the receiver will drive his feet, forcing him on his path. If the wide receiver is on the backside of the play he will take a path to crack the safety, which will set up a downfield block for any possible cutbacks made by the ball carrier.

Y: Your Tight End will have the same rules and techniques as the wide receiver if he is split out.  If your Y is on the line, then he will use the same techniques as the play side tackle, or the backside offensive linemen, in accordance with the direction of the play call in relation to his alignment.

Blocking Wing:  The blocking wing is the wingback on the play side of the formation.  He is responsible for getting his head outside of the first man outside of him.  He does not worry about anything inside of him.  If there is no defender outside of him, he will take a path to the safety.  If the play side linebacker crosses his trajectory while on his path, he will take him. (never pass up color)

Rocket Wing: The rocket wing is going to be your ball carrier.  On the “set” in the QB’s cadence, the wing will start his motion.  He will open and step directly at the fullbacks heels.  By the time the wing gets to the fullback he needs to be running at full speed.  The wing back CANNOT get any deeper than the fullbacks heels.  Once at his heels he needs to flatten his path out to be parallel with the line of scrimmage and running full speed. He should receive the ball when he is behind the play side wingback.  Once he has the football he will be racing to the edge and looking at the block of the wide receiver.  If the wide receiver turns the DB out, he will cut up the field and north.  If the DB is being pushed inside by the wide receiver, he will then get to the sideline outside of the defense.

Fullback:  The fullback will align with his heels at four yards behind the ball.  On the snap, we will block the backside defensive end.  It’s not that the backside end has a chance at the play, but rather it will set up the sally draw, the play action drop back and the keeper after the toss fake.  Also, due to the fact that you will be running belly a lot, teams may key the fullback, the fullback going backside may hold some of the pursuit on the toss.

QB: The quarterback will snap the ball when the rocket wing is directly behind the fullback.  If he snaps it too early, the wing back will not get the ball far enough out on the edge, so make sure the QB is patient and doesn’t snap the ball until the appropriate time.  Once the ball is snapped, he will take a half step back with his play side foot and then pivot hard to reverse out for the toss.  After he reverses out, he will step with his pivot foot directly at the wing back receiving the toss.  It is imperative that he QB keeps his arms strait and the hands never come higher than the waist.  If his elbows bend or his hands go higher than his waist the ball will go over the wing backs head, so keep on him about this and keep him disciplined.

Playside Tackle: The Play side tackle is going to do everything he can to get outside of the defensive end.  This is a “race” to the outside.his first step is going to be a lateral step that will open his shoulders and gain considerable ground.  Once the tackle has taken his third step he is going to try and rip up field with his inside arm.  This is a violent rip, he is trying to turn his shoulders back up field so he can block any scraping linebackers.  If the tackle cannot clear the defense end, he is going to lean into his rip and continue to race him outside.  If the tackle clears the defensive end, he is going to turn up field with his shoulders while still sprinting and looking inside with his eyes for scraping linebackers.

Playside Guard: You have two options that you can use for your play side guard.  First, you could give him the same rule as the play side tackle.  This could be better for a guard that cannot run that well.  If your guard can run, even just a little, I highly recommend pulling him to get an extra body at the point of attack.  The guard’s first step will open and gain ground and depth.  He will then be on a full sprint to get outside of the tackle.  Even though the tackle is “racing” to the sideline as well, you will find that the guard has little problem getting outside.  Once outside the guard will turn and sprint up field with his eyes inside looking for any defender in pursuit that is unblocked.

Center and Backside OL: The center and the backside offensive linemen have one rule, “Scoop”.  Scoop means that they will try and cut off any backside DL.  If there is a DL in the gap to the play side the OL will take a flat step down line and rip across the face of the defender.  The OL must lower his level to do this.  The OL’s entire body will have to turn to accomplish this.  The second step will also be gaining lateral ground but can also gain up field ground as well.  If the OL rips through clean, we will climb all the way up to the safety! If the rip is “dirty” meaning the DL is engaging him he will fight to rip clean and go to safety.  If the play side gap is empty, the backside lineman can go straight to the safety!  Take a path to cut off the safety. Coaching Point: Get to the safety by running full speed, but slow down once you get there, he is a DB, you’re an OL, don’t let him shake you in space.  Use the phrase, “8, 8ths to 7, 8ths” to illustrate the throttling down.

Rocket vs Odd and Even Fronts

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Against both the even and the odd fronts, the outside linebackers are going to be the key blocks.  If they are flying outside you should be able to cut up inside of him as the wing back washes him out.  If he is problematic for you, you can slow him down by getting into a nasty set, and cracking him.  We will cover this in the next section on change ups!

Change Ups

There are to very easy change ups to the rocket toss that are simple and effective in their implementation. For one the wide receiver will crack the safety, and the other, the wide receiver will crack the outside linebacker.

(Crack)

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Crack is the first change up.  The WR cracks the safety and the wing kicks the corner. All other players remain the same for the play.  This is a great play against aggressive safeties.

(Nasty)

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If you need to slow down some outside linebackers, getting into a formation with a nasty tag is a great way to do that.  The formation above is “Open Nasty”.  Any time you have toss called in a nasty set, the wide receiver knows that it is an automatic crack on the first linebacker inside of him.  This will set an edge and also make pursuit difficult for anybody inside of the crack block.

CLOSING

You should use the Rocket Toss in same manner as you would the Speed Sweep.  Stress the edge until the inside run game opens up.  Rocket pairs up nicely with all the base Wing-T and Flexbone plays!  Its biggest advantage may be the ease at which it can be installed. If you would like to know more about the Rocket Toss and other aspects of the Wing-T, then follow this link to “The Speed-T Offense: Vol 2” to learn everything that you need to know to run it effectively.  Make sure to subscribe to my email list so you can be updated anytime a new article posts, and follow me on twitter here @TheCoachVogt.

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The Lost Art of Belly

“The fear of the belly, makes all other plays indefensible.”

Few things make defensive coaches pull out their hair quite like the good ole Belly.  It’s a quick hitting, power play that takes advantage of the natural weakness of the C gap.  Defenses are forced to declare when they are committing to stopping the belly.  It is difficult to lose yards because the speed in which the play hits.  When committing to stopping the belly, the defense will leave themselves open to all other plays.  The belly is a great set up play for other run plays, but specifically toss, jet and counter match up with the belly almost seamlessly, and the play action game off belly can be devastating!

BELLY HISTORY

“Belly” refers to the action of the quarterback and the fullback in which the quarterback will ride the fullback’s path with ball in his belly.  First implemented by Bobby Dodd at Georgia Tech in the 1950s out of the “T” formation.  By the 1970s the belly had evolved to an entire series complete with companion plays.  You have Belly Dive (IZ), Belly G, Belly Option and even Belly Stretch (WZ).  The most common application of the belly is the Belly G, any wing-t guy worth his salt runs the Belly G religiously.  But these fellows are becoming less and less common.  The belly is becoming a lost art, it is not seen often, if at all in some areas of the country.

THE BASICS

Regardless of the variant being run, the footwork between the QB and FB will always be the same.  The QB will reverse out and step flat down the line to intercept the path of the FB and put the ball in his belly.  The FB will take a flat step, a crossover step and then step down hill at the tackles outside leg for an aim point.  It is important that the fullback keeps his shoulders square during the flat step and crossover step.  The tail back should do one of the following depending on your scheme/variant: carry out a fake (toss/jet), or get into pitch relationship with the QB.  Your quarter back should fake the option after handing the ball off if he is the mobile type.  For a more pro-style QB I like to have him fake a pass drop after he hands off the ball.

BELLY G

For the sake of this article we will focus on the most common variant is the Belly G.  The offensive line will scoop on the backside and gap block on the frontside. It is important to know that the playside tackle needs to gap all the way down to the A gap when a shade nose is present to help prevent penetration.  The playside guard will pull with a tight downhill path and kickout the playside edge defender, if the edge defender is spilling, the guard will log and pin him in so the FB can bounce.  If there is a wing to the playside then he will arc release and pin the playside linebacker, placing his head in front.  This variant in particular works extremely well in conjunction with a toss fake or a jet sweep fake.  Here is a diagram of Belly G vs a 50 front:

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Here are some film clips of Belly G:

BELLY COMPANIONS

If you are going to run the Belly G, I recommend you to have companions to go along with it.  When you effectively run the Belly G it will be so feared that the defense will clearly show you when they are selling out to stop it.  This fact makes it near impossible to stop your companion plays!  You will fake the Belly G and give the ball to a different back.  The fake does not have to be exact, it just needs to have the same initial action by the backs and OL to be highly effective.  Your companion plays should fall into 2 categories: same side companion, and opposite side companion.  Examples of same side plays would be jet sweep, toss and option.  Examples of opposite side plays would be counter and reverse.

Here are some examples of toss as a same side companion, toss is a great way to take advantage of edge players that are playing hard inside and spilling.  Take a look:

Here are a few examples of counter as an opposite side companion. Use counter when the defenses backside players are over pursuing to the playside. Take a look:

PLAY ACTION

Play action pass can be absolutely devastating off of a belly fake, especially when used in conjunction with formations that force the secondary into run fit responsibilities.  This places the defensive backs into a conundrum.  They must play the belly to support the run game, yet if they do, they leave open quick strike passing opportunities. The trick is to call them at the right moment.  Here are a few examples of what can happen when called at the correct moment:

CLOSING

The Belly Series is not something that has been common for some time.  But if you are in the search for that missing piece of your offense, it just may be the ticket.  Highly effective, quick hitting, multiple variants, and the ability to open up multiple set up plays.  If you wish to learn how to incorporate the belly into your current offense then check out the, TheCoachVogt.com installation page HERE where it is part of the Pro-T offensive series.  Follow me on twitter here @thecoachvogt and be sure to subscribe to the email list so you can be updated every time a new article is posted.

 

 

Simple Steps For Defending The Wing-T

After receiving feedback from my subscribers and followers, which you all know I love so much you guys are awesome motivation!  I decided to write a quick guide on How to soundly defend against the wing-T offense.  Anybody who has defended a disciplined Wing-T team knows how frustrating it can be.  They can seemingly move the ball down field in 3-5 yard chunks at will, even when you have athletes superior to theirs.  Its not necessarily the wing-T plays that allow them to do this.  It is how they manipulate the flanks, numbers, and angles to get more bodies than you have at the point of attack. What I have here are 6 simple steps to follow that will help you, at the least, be defensively sound.  For purposes of this article we will assume that the offense is NOT a triple option team, I will have a separate article for that soon.

STEP 1- Don’t Use An Even Front

I know, I know, all you coaches that live and die by 4-4, 4-3 and 4-2-5 are about to get up in arms, but please hear me out before you close the article.  If you run an even front you basically have 3 choices

  • Put the DE in a 7, and now your outflanked
  • Put the DE in a 9, what ever you do never, ever use a 3 and 9 against any run first team. The C gap is a natural weak spot as it is.
  • Use a 3, a 5 and walk the Sam down which forces you to walk out the Mike and now your middle is softened and you have taken away pursuit to the short side as well.

There is a reason offensive guys call TE-wing sets even killers.  A knowledgeable wing-T guy will force you into defensive looks you don’t want to be in 6 ways from Sunday. Save yourself the head aches and go to an odd front.  I prefer an under front as shown below:

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Here you can see we are gap sound, and the offense does not have us outflanked on either side.  The odd front allows us to balance up and force the offense to beat us man on man.

STEP 2-Have At Least 5 Guys On Each Side

Wing-T guys will always play the numbers game.  You will need at least 5 guys on each side of the formation to be sound.  Ill use the previous picture again to demonstrate:

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If you put a line down the center of the offense and defense you will see at least 5 on each side.  This rule will keep you sound in the numbers game and again force the offense to beat you man on man.

STEP 3-Never Leave The Weak B Gap Empty

You need a down lineman in the weak B gap, PERIOD!  If you don’t you will get Belly weak until the cows come home, if you start cheating the belly you get belly option.  Simply putting a down guy in B gap forces 2 things to happen.

  • The guard and tackle must base block the 3 and the 5 making the angle for the wing back insert extremely difficult.
  • The guard and tackle must “X” block the backside giving your edge player ample time to spill.

to defend the weak side trap your 3 tech will squeeze and spill just like an edge player would.  If he is getting trapped, find a new 3 tech, or tilt him so he can more effectively squeeze the down block by the guard.

If you get a double wing look, shift into a bear front.  This gives you 2 down guys in B gap and 2 guys on the wings to keep from being out flanked.  You can see that there are still 5 guys on each side of the ball as well.  Here is a photo:

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STEP 4-Beat On Up The Wings

The edge players will align head up on the wings.  They will step with inside foot and punch the wings while keeping eyes inside.  If the wing tries to block him it means 1 of 2 things.

  • Buck Sweep
  • Jet/Rocket sweep

When that wing tries to block him you will have your guy shove him straight backwards to take out a guard (hopefully the front side guard) on buck sweep, or to shed and pursue the jet/rocket sweep.  If the wing releases it’s the Belly G or Belly Option.  Either way, he will target the guard’s inside thigh to either create a pile, or a violent enough spill to make a play on the fullback. If the wing goes in motion away, he should be looking for waggle and counter coming back at him.

STEP 5-Eliminate Guard Kickouts

Step 4 touched on this briefly.  Wing T guys will do anything they can to get guards on your DBs.  Eventually its going to happen, but you can give your DBs the tools necessary to eliminate the guard kickout.  Just like the edge player targeted the inside thigh of the guard, the corner will too.  Looking for the same results.  Be careful however, if you coach in a place where the chop is not allowed you need to make sure that the players are not diving at the legs.  They need attack aggressively, then square shoulders to the LOS and use momentum and leverage to step hard inside and put the shoulder pad on the thigh pad.  Many times, the defender will remain on his feet while the guard either loses his balance or loses contact with the defender.  At the least you can create a nasty pile that the back has to bubble around which allows your defense to rally to the football.

STEP 6-Practice

If you have a wing-T team in your district or one you routinely schedule, then practice against wing-T sets at least once a week.

SHOT GUN WING-T

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If the offense has a QB…. This is the hardest wing-T set to defend.  First it takes you out of your odd look so you can cover the slot up. The QB can read the edge player, or can read the LB for RPOs or just keep it and hit the weak B gap if the LB chases the guard.  I would force the offense to run weak based on numbers.  I feel with the alignment shown above the offense has no choice but to run it weak. As far as defending the RPO, the OLB is going to beat the snot out of that slot player.  That is the most un-officiated part of the field, you will use that to your advantage and do what ever is necessary to prevent that slot from an inside release.  Knock him down, grab him do what you have to if you cant run with him.  I play a 1 high look because most gun guys will not throw that stop over and over…eventually they all get impatient and try for bomb…now you got them in long sticks, or even better… an interception or sack.

CLOSING

While not a complete answer to anything and everything a wing-T team can or will do, this is a very good set of rules to use when preparing for the offense.  As always scout what they do and when they do it, to have the greatest advantages you can. Here is the list of rules again

  1. No even fronts
  2. 5 on each side
  3. Never leave weak B gap empty
  4. Beat up the wings
  5. Eliminate guards
  6. Practice

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What’s Your System?

What’s Your System?

During the first, six years of my coaching career I was on the defensive side of the football.  Still to this day as an Offensive Coordinator I develop my offense with a defensive frame of mind.  What I mean by that is my offense is viewed as a system, and not a collection of plays as I feel so many coaches do these days.   Imagine if a defense called plays like most offenses do.  A different front every snap, different stunt or blitz every snap.  Sometimes a different defensive base from week to week.  There is a term used for this kind of defense, “Dial-A-D”, it is not a complimentary term.

You see this from time to time on the defensive side and usually the defensive coordinator is looking for work in the spring.  But on the offensive side it seams this is a regular occurrence.   Teams will bounce around from scheme to scheme within a series and its acceptable, but more often than not, it is not effective.  The offense relies on big plays that are inconsistent and they can not drive the field and score.  I personally find this type of offensive play calling the result of a general lack of knowledge and copy cat syndrome.  What I propose is installing your offense like a defense does.  Install it as system that has an answer for whatever the defense is doing.

STEP 1: SYSTEM SELECTION

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It can be any offense. Zone based, Gap based, WingT, Spread, Option, Multiple I, or any combination.  The idea is to avoid scheme hopping and attack the defense with a systematic approach.  Have an answer for everything the defense does no matter what the play call is.  I suggest selecting what you know and sticking with your guns.  Run it till the coaches and players know it in their sleep. Once you have established your offense then you can trim which I feel may be the most important step.

STEP 2: TRIMMING

Whatever you choose as your offensive route be it spread tempo or the receiver-less single wing set, every offense benefits from trimming the playbook.  Almost universally, when the offense trims the playbook you see an increase in offensive production.  Why does this happen? Your players have to remember less, you get more reps against more fronts due to more time being spent on fewer plays, players become confident in knowing what to do because of more reps.  When players know what to do they play faster, that is a well proven fact.

Ill use my team as an example, we have 4 plays.  We will throw some change ups in sometimes if we want to show something new and shiny on film, but we base out of 4, that’s it.  Sometimes I feel this is too much and think about going to 2 or 3 plays.  My number one play is the widezone, I have my reasons for this but for purpose of the article I’ll avoid getting into that. I mention it to bring up the point that every play needs to have a companion play that places the defense in a bind, if they overplay widezone we hit them with powerO.  My number 2 play is the blast (a modified toss) the companion for this one is bellyG.  The plays you select are up to you, just make sure you have a companion for each.  Sometimes, like I said, 4 can be a little much.  Lots of teams in NCAA and NFL football use 1 and 2!  A team out of Orlando, FL has routinely pummeled everyone they play with only these 3: jet sweep, bellyG and counterGT.  All 3 companion off each other!  A great system. The point is by running a limited number of plays to perfection, the offense can incorporate all 11 players to handle the defense no matter how they line up.

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STEP 3: ESTABLISHING WHAT YOU WANT TO DO

What are you trying to do to the defense? This question needs to have a clear answer before you take the field Friday night.  Are you going to tempo them to keep them on their heels? Are you going to formation them?  What are you going to do with your formations?  Having lots of formations is pointless unless you have a system or purpose for them.  Are you getting in spread to run the ball in the middle?  Just because you line up in 4 wide doesn’t mean the defense will empty the box.  Your system better have an answer for this.  While I’m not a huge fan of the spread, the guys you run it have come with lots of ingenious ways to combine base play and companion play into one package.  One example is inside zone and bubble screen.

As I said previously we have over 100 formations.  The purpose is to outflank the defense.  Get more numbers than they have where we can get easy yards. The secondary purpose is to place the secondary in to assignment binds by forcing them to play run gaps.  Now they have to worry about fitting on run and covering for pass.  If the defense can manage to line up to our formations our system can still handle the front because our players know exactly what to do.

WHAT TO AVOID

  • Becoming too scheme heavy.
    • This makes you fundamentally unsound
  • Illogical progressions
    • Switching from scheme to scheme cuts down on practice time
    • Having too many concepts causes linemen to become tentative
      • They start thinking
      • Doubting their assignment (paralysis by analysis)

WHAT TO ESTABLISH

  • A “base”
    • Use a base offense each week
  • Tempo
    • Control the tempo of the game
    • Can go fast or go slow. I suggest what I call strategic tempo
      • Only tempo when you know you have the defense on heels or in a misalignment
      • Going fast for the sake of fast leads to 3-N-Out in 7 seconds
      • Most importantly keep the other offense off the field
    • Expand & Contract
      • Compress and spread the defense with tight, open and unbalanced sets to cause misalignments
      • Place stress on the defense with shifts, motions and trades
    • Adjustments
      • Adjust with formations, tempo or window dressings, not countless new schemes and plays

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A LEGEND OF THE FALL

Tubby Raymond and the Wing-T

There is probably no other coach in history that has had as much of an impact on this game than Tubby Raymond.   In the Early 1950s Tubby and his staff developed the offense that would eventually permeate every single offense in the country in some form or another if not directly copied.  That offense was the Delaware Wing-T.  More than just a style of play, it is a systematic method of attacking a defense, allowing smaller less athletic players to be successful using angles and numbers on the edge.  My personal exposure to the Wing-T came as early as I can remember.  My father was a head football coach since before I was born, early mornings for me consisted of buck sweeps, bellyG’s and down options.  At that point the offense was over 30 years old, now in 2017 it is still prevalent everywhere you look from peewees to pros.

Numbers and Angles

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The numbers advantage of the Wing-T is very apparent on the edge.  The wings are on the line of scrimmage creating extra run gaps for the defense to account for.  This forces the defense to incorporate the secondary into the run fits, opening up deadly play action passing opportunities.  Coupled with unbalanced you can place a lot of stresses on the defense.  The numbers advantage also extends into the back field as it can be a true 4 back offense, allowing the skill players to share the load.  The versatility of the Wing-T is on display today as several major Division One football programs have incorporated the Wing-T into the spread offense. Auburn and Clemson are the obvious examples here.

Probably the greatest advantage of the Wing-T is the use of angles for the offensive linemen to complete blocking assignments.  Typically on the front side the blockers will “gap” block.  Meaning they will come down on an angle on the first man inside of him to the nose of the adjacent blocker, if there is nobody there or the man disappears he will climb to next level.  It is all quick pin blocking to allow the ball carrier to quickly get to the crease.  This makes it possible for small, undersized, out muscled linemen to still be successful.

Conflicts and Misdirection

Play calling in the Wing-T is all about creating conflicts.  You do this with play series and “companion” plays.  The example we will use is buck sweep and bellyG.  If the defender on the edge is playing to stop the buck sweep, then by nature he is leaving himself open for the bellyG. He cannot play both. When he starts to squeeze, so he can make a play on the bellyG you go back to buck sweep. Both of these plays place the secondary in conflict as well. This is due to the extra run gaps they are responsible for filling.  Once you identify that the secondary has begun playing run aggressively you can then go for a play action shot for the end zone. The misdirection comes into play because the QB has his back turned to the defense after the snap and a fake is carried out for each plays companion play, further placing the defensive into conflicts of assignments.

Permeation and Evolution

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Since it’s the development the Wing-T has permeated every level of football.  I used Auburn as an example of how the offense has been incorporated into the spread. But how about the NFL?  Lately we have been seeing some buck sweep and even bellyG in the NFL, but the Wing-T’s impact started much earlier.

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In the late 1970’s and early 1980’s Tubby Raymond and his staff began doing something that would eventually dominate NFL offenses.  They started running jet sweep and zone blocking with the offensive line.  The lateral movement of the offensive line and cut blocks on the backside would be the basis of the modern widezone. Naturally they also began faking the jet sweep and handing the zone play to the fullback, looking very much like the zone plays you see in almost every run play in the NFL today. Just like the buck sweep and bellyG the jet sweep and zone to the full back is about numbers and angles, instead of pinning inside, the zone series stretches the edge out, creating run lanes for the ball carrier.

Closing and Resources

As always please feel free to comment, share and follow with your email.  You can also give me a follow on twitter @thecoachvogt.com.  Also check out bucksweep.com it is an outstanding resource on the Wing-T offense.   And here is a video of Tubby explaining why he created the Wing-T with a quick description of the buck sweep and the BellyG.