quick game

Adding Air Raid Concepts to Any Offense!

Using a simple quick passing attack in a run first offense can keep the defense on its toes.  This article is an excerpt from my book “The Speed-T Offense”. This concept can be used in any run first offense from flexbone/SBV to single wing, but if you are interested in checking out some wing-T stuff, you can get my book HERE!

The passing game covered here will be to use in addition to your current play action passing attack.  The purpose here is to put in something that is super simple but still effective.  Most of your time will be dedicated to your run game, and play action passes.  This needs to be something that is inexpensive yet will yield good results.  For that purpose, we are going to steal a concept directly from the Air raid offense so frequently seen in offenses today.  So, all that said, let’s dig in.

BASICS

First, and foremost, it needs to be simple. It needs to be simple for the offensive line, and for the skill players.  Both in protection and routes being ran.  Second, it needs to utilize high percentage routes.  Lastly, it needs to get the ball out in three seconds or less, to make it easier on the offensive linemen and the QB alike.  Here is how you will accomplish this.

The play call is going to set the formation AND the protection with one word.  We will use the words “red” and “blue” for the sake of this article, but you can obviously use whatever word you would like. Red will be 3×1 right, with protection set right.  Blue will be 3×1 left, with protection set left.  Next, you will say a number: one, two or three.  This will tell the receivers what to run. THAT IS IT! The play is called.  Here is a look at an example of each one:

BLUE 3:

blue3

RED 2:

red 2

PROTECTION

Red and Blue are your protections and formations.  A simple half slide will suffice for this, half slide is covered in depth in my BOOK.  Big on Big can work, but will require a lot of work fundamentally.  Half slide is easy to do and simple to teach, in a future article I will speak on half slide as a base pass protection.  If you want to get even easier, go full slide, however, you will need to have a fullback that likes to take on defensive ends.  There are not too many of those out there, but if you got one, full slide is the way to go.  But if you already have a base protection for drop back passing…. just use that.

ROUTES

The routes are going to be determined by the number that is called. As a base rule, EVERY receiver will have a five yard hitch.  This means they will run to six yards, turn back in to the QB and stop when they get back to five yards.  Every receiver will assume that they are getting the ball.  If the number of the corresponding receiver is called, he will then have a vertical route. (If your QB is a good one, then your WRs can run option routes. I prefer corner/post for that) On his fifth to sixth step the vertical should be looking for the ball if he is an inside receiver.  If he is an outside receiver, he will look for the ball on his seventh to tenth step.  The number “1” will be the outside receivers.  The number “2” will be the Z.  The number “3” will be the A.  If their number is not called, then they have a hitch.  Your quick screens can be used in this series as well.  This may be the simplest pass game in America right now, Hitches and quick screens… combined with your normal ground and pound offense, you will need no more.

QB RULES

The QB only has three seconds to get rid of the ball.  If he has not gotten rid of the ball in that time he will throw it out of bounds or take off with it.  He WILL NOT throw a pick! If he can help it, he will not get sacked, or at least make it back to the line of scrimmage.  Where the QB will go with the ball is going to be determined pre snap.  He is looking for a hitch to be open pre snap.  When he identifies him, that’s it. That is where is going with the ball, catch the snap and get it out there.  If there is not a hitch open pre snap, or an obvious post snap movement to take it away, he will go to the vertical.  If the vertical is not there, he runs the ball or throws it away.  Very simple, even for young QB’s.

RUN PLAYS

Running the football is NOT what this is for, as sacrilegious as that sounds.  This is a change up for the defense, and something to add some new era flash to your offense.  Your kids will like it and get excited about doing it if you limit its use.  You are going to throw the football in these formations every single time, until you get a five man box.  Once you get your five man box you can call a run play.  Pick just one to use for this series.  Good ones to use are trap, Counter and sally draw.  Trap is obviously going to hit quickest, and sally draw is going to mimic a pass play.  What you choose is up to you.  In my personal opinion, sally draw would be the better choice as you will have a body on body, and the linebackers will most likely bail.

CLOSING

These are simple concepts that can be added to anything that you are already doing!  You can even incorporate them in to your base formations.  Whether that be wing-T or Pro-i.  use the same rules for the OL and WR and you are gold!  Please feel free to reach out with any questions! Subscribe to the email list to be notified when new articles post and be sure to follow me on twitter at @TheCoachVogt

 

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Using Wide Zone to Set Up the “Look Pass” By: Chad Weeks

In the first article Building an Aerial Attack Around the Wide Zone I talked about the 2 primary passing compliments to Wide Zone, the Keeper and the Solid Pass. These are most certainly the core components of our non-drop back passing offense. In this article, I will discuss another key component of our passing game built around Wide Zone, which is the Look Pass.

THE LOOK PASS

1look

The Look Pass is our simplest compliment to Wide Zone. It is cheap to install and we only have to work it 5 minutes a day. We attach this to the backside of Wide Zone, though we have attached it to the backside of several different runs.

We only run this under center because we want the ball to come out fast. The receiver will not have any blocking so he has to have the ball fast and accurately to be able to make a move. If we were going to run something like this in shotgun, we would have to add a blocker, which is fine, but that’s not what we are trying to do here.

We predominantly run Look Pass to the backside of 3×1 formations but it can be done to a 2×2 formation. The inside receiver simply push-cracks the safety and is not part of the Look pass equation.

2look

RULES

The rule for the QB is easy, and the decision is made pre-snap. If you feel the receiver has enough cushion to make the catch, secure the ball, and make a move then throw it. After that its on the receiver to do something with it.

The rules for the receiver are very simple. Our footwork is as simple as loading the weight on the front foot of the stance, pushing off and pivoting back. That’s it. After catching it his rule is to get to a point 5 yards downfield on the sideline, after that the athlete takes over.

3look

We’ve found that by having the receiver pivot away from the defender we have more success with it rather than foot firing or taking one pop step. First, there is now more separation, which means we can throw it to a tighter corner than most would. Secondly, the defenders typically are slower to trigger when the receiver simply steps off the line of scrimmage. This doesn’t look the same as the quick screens they are used to seeing every week. Finally, it’s a cleaner more consistent picture for the QB which leads to a faster throw. I work with the QB’s to get used to throwing from multiple arm slots. The most important part of this throw is to not sail it. Anything low the receiver can usually salvage it, anything high this is dead in the water and we may as well have handed it off on Wide Zone.

4look

I only ask for 5 yards, anything extra the athlete creates on his own by beating the man trying to tackle him one on one. It is crucial to coach that point though, they have to attack the sideline. This creates space between them and the other 10 defenders that will be pursuing and it give them the opportunity to cut back on the defender trying to tackle him one on one. The runner reads the leverage of the defender. If the defender keeps inside leverage he will violently try to rip under the tackle and press down the sideline. If the defender keeps outside leverage the runner will break down the cushion between them then get up field underneath the defender, but will get back outside as fast as he can to avoid the other pursuing defenders.

DRILLING IT

5look

We work Look Pass in a simple “pre-practice” drill. Again 5 minutes a day, if you want to get it done even faster, and you can be really honest with yourself, you could just throw this to the guys who would realistically be running it in games.

EXAMPLES

The following are good examples of Look Pass in action. Notice on all 4 the ball gets out very quickly and hits the WR in the chest. This makes his life so much easier and allows our best offensive player to beat the defender one on one.

These clips show bad examples of Look Pass. Notice on these two clips the WR’s hesitate and even work back inside, which is the worst thing you can do.

This clip shows an example of when the QB should have thrown it and didn’t.

FUTURE DEVELOPMENTS

One of the adjustments we didn’t invest in until late last year was also running Look Pass with a 0-Step Slant or what we called “Strike” to beat the Catch-Man coverage we saw a ton of last year. The QB and WR would communicate this with a simple hand signal. By default it was a normal Look Pass, if the signal was given it was converted to the Strike. We didn’t run it live in a game, but it was something that we had available if we needed it. We will be investing in this heavier this year to make sure we get what we want from it and that the QB is comfortable with the throw.

CLOSING

As simple as Look Pass is it’s the best attachment we have for Wide Zone. Though not as sexy as post-snap RPOs this is cheap and simple way to get the ball into your best receiver’s hands on run downs. I feel just as comfortable with this short throw and catch into space as I am handing it off. One of the biggest regrets I have from last season is not pushing our QB to throw it more often.

Follow Coach weeks on twitter here @weekschad

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