practice

Offensive Line Technique for Wide Zone

The one question that I get asked the most when it comes to running the Wide Zone is without a doubt concerning the footwork and techniques used by the offensive linemen.  This makes a lot of sense, because if you cannot cover your basis up front, then it will not matter what you run as an offense scheme.  In this article we will cover the techniques used by the covered and uncovered linemen for the Wide Zone.

Covered Footwork and Technique

The steps and hand placement of the covered lineman to the play side will depend on the alignment of the defensive player, and whether or not the covered OL has help coming.  The 1st step must be lateral.  He cannot step up field or he will lose the fight. The width of that step is directly proportional to the alignment of the DL.  Tell that OL that he needs to take the step necessary to get his hat across the face of the defender.  We want the shoulders to stay as square as possible but understand that a wide alignment of the DL (like a widened 5 tech) will cause the blocker to naturally open his shoulders some to accommodate getting his head across, this also will prevent him from becoming over extended. A head up alignment might be a 2 to 4 inch step, while an outside shade might be 6 to 8 inches worth of step.

Regardless of how small the step we always need to GAIN GROUND! Ground needs to be covered.  Always be vocal about this, they need to hear you say it all the time. Picking the foot up and putting it back down, or worse bringing it backwards will result in the OL being beat by the DL in almost every occasion, no matter what scheme you are running.  On that 1st step the OL will also load his hands.  Loading the hands means the OL will pull his elbows back with his thumbs turned out.  Having the thumbs turned out forces the elbows in tight where we want them.  Remember this 1st step CANNOT be up field.

While the 1st step provides leverage and get off, the 2nd steps provides hat and hand placement and the lateral drive of the block.  The 2nd step is a hard, aggressive up field step that will split the crotch of the defender.  It needs to be violent, and right in between the legs of the DL. I use the coaching cue of “knee him the balls!”  They need to understand that the ferocity of this step is paramount to it being successful.  The 2nd step is when contact with the defender is made.  The hat and hands will strike at the same time.  The hat goes to the outside shoulder of the defender. The hands will now deliver a violent punch (thumbs out).  We do not extend this punch, we want to stay tight to the defender. The play side hand will strike the play side armpit and the backside hand strikes under the breast plate like an upper cut to the sternum and the OL will work the outside half of the defender.

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The 3rd step will again gain ground and work towards the outside half of the defender.  The hat of the OL is to remain on the outside half of the defender, HOWEVER!  Here is a big misconception of the wide zone.  We are not trying to reach the defensive lineman and capture his outside shoulder.  We put our hat on the outside to get the lineman to fight outside and help us create lateral movement. By the time the OL takes his 3rd step the DL will either have committed outside or have been pushed outside by the OL that is doubling.  Once the DL has been forced or has committed outside the OL will straighten out his backside hand and RUN as fast as he can and take the DL on his path.  He needs to keep the back hand locked to prevent the DL from trying to throw him by when the RB makes his cut. Coaching Points: the DL belongs to the covered man unless he makes an inside move on the snap.  It is the job of the combination to force him outside so the covered OL can take him on his path. By the 3rd step the OL should be running the DL towards the sideline. 

If the covered OL does not have help coming from the OL inside of him (meaning the adjacent OL is also covered) then the technique changes slightly.  The hat, hands and footwork remain the same.  We still want hat outside, but now it becomes more of a drive block down the middle of the defender, with the back hand in the backside armpit instead up in the sternum (thumbs still turned out).  This will take away from some of the lateral get off and movement, but we must protect against an inside move by the defender (see below).  Taking the outside half can put the OT in a situation to fail, so we line him up down the middle once contact is made.

(pic below is bad juju….  use the technique described above to eliminate this.)

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Every single day you need to start practice with a drill called Stance and Starts.  This can be your 1st drill in individual period, but I prefer to do it as a pre-practice drill.  The Drill reinforces foot, hat and hand placement and once taught, the drill should be done rapid fire, as quickly as possible.  Start off by having all the OL line up on the goal line and get into a proper stance: Feet set at shoulder width or just inside the shoulders, toes pointed in, flat backs eyes up.  Balanced stances, you should be able to kick their hands out from under them without them having to take a step forward.  This is actually important!  If they have too much weight forward, they cannot step laterally and will step forward and lose.  It’s just physics.  Make them hold this stance in 15 to 30 second increments.  You can use this time to speak to them about anything you need as well.  After the stance hold, have them partner up on the goal line facing each other.  One side will be dummies, the other side will be blockers. (see below)

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Here is how you will operate the drill. You will use this cadence: “hand down, set hut, hand down, set hut, hand down, set hut”. This is done fast.  Make them work.  The presence of the dummies is to provide landmarks for the blockers. The dummies will start off head up.  The blockers will take one step (lateral) to the right and load hands (thumbs out) with head outside of the dummy.  Do this over and over again until satisfied.  Then move to 2 steps.  1 lateral, 1 splitting the crotch. On the 2nd step the blocker delivers the hat hand strike on the outside half of the defender with all the proper land marks for the hands (thumbs out).  Do this over and over again until satisfied. You then will work overtakes, the blockers will overtake the adjacent man’s dummy.  Like this:

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Force them to sprint back to the start point, you want to keep that “hand down, set hut” cadence going.  Once satisfied have the dummies and blockers flip and do the same thing.  Once finished with the new blockers flip back to the originals and go to the left.  The whole thing should take 5-10 minutes.  It gets shorter as the OL learns how the drill works and can operate without much instruction.  Coaching Points: if I catch one of the blockers using improper footwork or hand placement on this drill it is because they are being lazy, I make both the blocker and dummy do up-downs. The blocker for being lazy and the dummy for allowing his teammate to cheat the drill and not get better.  The dummies also operate as coaches, if they see improper feet, hands or hat, they must correct it.

1 Knee Reach Drill: The 1 knee reach is designed to emphasize the lateral drive of the reach block.  You will set the drill up in two lines. It will look like this:

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The lines will work in opposite directions, one blocker at time so you can watch each block.  You will use the same cadence as the Stance and Start Drill.  Left side will go, then right side will go.  The blocker will get down on his outside knee and drive off his inside foot to take a lateral step and get on the outside half of the defender.  Make sure the blocker loads hands (thumbs out) on first step and splits the crotch and strikes on the 2nd.  You will quickly see which of your lineman are weak in the hips and legs with this drill.  Really stress getting that head outside, and getting on half the man.  Do not blow the block dead until you have the pair running sideways! By the blockers 3rd step he should be working to straighten the back and sprint that dummy to the sideline.

The dummy will be in a 2 point stance in head up alignment to start, take a short outside step on contact and work outside trying to act like a defender fighting the reach block.  Once the block is whistled dead, the dummy will go to the back of the opposite line and the blocker will become a dummy.  Make the new dummy sprint back.  He should be back and set before the block going the other way is finished.  You CANNOT wait on them to stroll back, it will kill your reps.  Every drill you do will be at a high tempo.  If you need to slow down for teaching purposes, then do so.  Once you have adequate reps with head up alignment then move the dummies to outside shades.  Coaching Points: always spend the most time on what you will see that week.  No point in working the shit out of head up alignment if they will be in shades on Friday. 

Reach Drill: The Reach Drill is essentially the same exact drill as the 1 Knee Reach.  The only difference is that now, the blockers are in normal 3 point stances.  Spend the majority of your reach work in 3 point stances.  You use the 1 knee reach when your OL is having footwork issues, such as stepping backwards, or not gaining ground laterally on the 1st step.

Remember to stress the difference in the 1st step in relation to the alignment of the defender.  The 2nd step splits the crotch and you get the hat and hand strike (thumbs outside).  By the 3rd step the OL needs to start working on straightening that back hand to torque the defender outside and RUN!  2 things should be repeatedly heard by your OL. “RUN!” and “GAIN GROUND!”  In live situations, improper hand or hat placement can be overcome by these 2 things.   Optimally of course you want it perfect, but when the bullets are live, you don’t get do overs.  So they will at least have pretty good chance if they are running and gaining ground! You need that lateral movement. Of course it’s great if you get some vertical push, but the lateral push is a MUST.  The key to establishing this is the uncovered offensive lineman.

Uncovered Footwork and Technique

The footwork of the uncovered lineman will remain the same no matter the alignment of the defensive lineman.  He will take a flat, open step directly at the adjacent lineman that he is in combination with.  He MUST gain significant lateral ground bringing his body with his step. He MUST open his hips and shoulders to do this. He must NOT step up field on the step.  The aim point for the uncovered OL is the nose of the adjacent OL.  His 2nd step will aimed directly at the nose of the adjacent OL.  This the path that must be taken in order to overtake any inside move by the defensive lineman. (example below)

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The goal of the uncovered OL is to get his hat across the face of the DL on an inside move by the DL.  If this does not happen by the 3rd step of the uncovered OL he will shove the DL onto the lap of the covered lineman and climb to the 2nd level for a linebacker.  The uncovered OL will initially make these fundamental flaws when installing the wide zone.

  • Taking a lateral step instead of a flat step
    • This takes repetition and demonstration. A good way to show the “why” is to have a DL take one step and the OL take one step so the OL can see where the hat of the DL is and understand it will be impossible for him to get his own hat across.  Then have them do the same thing, this time with correct footwork to show the difference.  Make sure in the stance and start drills you are vigilant about taking the proper 1st and 2nd
  • Shuffling instead of turning and running
    • The disdain that offensive lineman have for running is usually the cause of them being offensive lineman. Shuffling is easier than turning their bodies and running.  You must make them do this over and over again.  If you see that they are shuffling instead of running it needs to be addressed and fixed immediately every time. A drill to help with this is the 5 man sled fit.  The OL will line up leaving the last dummy on the sled uncovered.  Each OL will take uncovered footwork and fit on the dummy that is one man over and hold it there for the coach to check.  The last man on the line will go to the back of the line and the next guy will fill in so each OL gets 5 reps in a row before resting.  Make sure they fit on the outside half of the dummy. Once satisfied, switch directions.

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Another good drill for this is the 2 man fit and run.  2 OL will start fitted up to a DL and will RUN him sideways until the uncovered man can push him outside. This drill is more for demonstrative purposes to show the importance of running.  By running often times a combo can take the down guy and sit him in the laps of scraping LBs.  If the DL can’t or won’t run with the combo your offense will have the edge!  When you capture the flanks good things happen.  This is true in all combative sports and is strived for in military tactics.  You will repeatedly smash the football into B and C gaps until the defense jumps inside or can’t run anymore and you will get big plays on the perimeter.

  • Going straight into a 2nd level climb instead of combo blocking the down guy
    • You must stress the importance of taking care of the down guy 1st at any cost. Even at the cost of leaving an LB unblocked.  The down guy will get you for a loss.  The LB will have to make a tackle in space, we at least have a chance there.  The job of the uncovered lineman is to take 3 steps on track so he can shove the DL outside and then climb.  The 3 step minimum takes care of any inside move by the DL.  If he has not made his inside move by his 3rd step he is not going to do so.  After the 3rd step he will climb to the 2nd level

The uncovered OL will see 3 possible scenarios: an inside move in which he will overtake, an outside move in which he will push (if he can, the DL make disappear outside) then climb, and a sit/read technique by the DL in which he will push, then climb.  The 2nd level climb is so the uncovered OL can block the linebacker that is flowing with the play. Coaching Points: Good linebackers always go underneath.  They are better athletes than your OL will ever be.  They will make him look like a fool in space.  The OL must take a path that forces the LB to bubble over the top.  Your uncovered OL will also never chase a linebacker over the top of the combo, rather he will turn back for the next LB. (see below)

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The reason for this rule is under the circumstances in which the uncovered OL is the climber the ball is going to cut back!  The LB that ran over the top of the combo has just run himself out of the play.  The ball carrier will hit this behind him.  If the LB plays disciplined and stays in his gap, the OL will block him on his track and make him bubble over the top. Remember that good LBs always go underneath the block and make a play.  Force that guy over top.  The track of the OL should reflect this.  Once the OL is in a climb phase he will slow down to 7/8 speed and take a 45 degree path while squaring his shoulders.  Once contact is made he will accelerate his feet and finish the block. We aim right between the numbers of the LB.  We do not want to give him the opportunity to slice under us and make a tackle by aiming at his outside shoulder.  By doing this we can ensure that the ball carrier will get an extra few yards even if the LB makes the tackle.  This happens because the LB had to lose ground in order to avoid us.  Of course, we would much rather make contact and block his ass.

Closing

As far as the individual lineman goes, this covers the techniques needed for the successful running of the Wide Zone.  If you would like more information about this scheme such as combination techniques, change ups, leveraging defenders and play action passes, you will need to go grab a copy of “Installing the Wide Zone“.  Make sure you sign up for my email list so you can be notified any time a new article posts and follow me on twitter at @thecoachvogt.

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Teaching the Reach Block

The Reach Block.  Out of any skill utilized by an offensive lineman, this one may have the biggest factor on the success of the run game.  If you can consistently capture the edge of a defensive front, you are in great position to control the game and create explosive plays in the run game.  However, in today’s era of wide open offenses whose run games consist of inside zone and power, is the reach block still relevant?  The answer is, of course it is!  After all, a zone block is a reach block modified to allow the back to make reads.  Capturing the edge of a defensive front will ALWAYS be a sound strategy for attacking a defense from peewee ball to the big leagues!

The Reach Block can be classified into three main categories.  The stretch block, the traditional reach block and the rip and run.  All three, allow an opportunity for the flank to be captured, with an emphasis on a desired location for the ball carrier to aim for as a primary attack point.  Let’s take a look at each one, and which offense can incorporate it into their general schemes.

STRETCH BLOCK

The Stretch Block is probably the most utilized variant of the reach in football today.  The prevalence of zone schemes in all levels of football show the versatility of the stretch block.  The general idea is for the offensive lineman to take a flat step towards the play side, while keeping his shoulders as square as possible. How square the offensive lineman can keep his shoulders will depend on the alignment and ability of the defensive lineman.  Like all reach blocks, you want the helmet of the offensive lineman to cross the face of the defensive lineman.  Where exactly you want the helmet to target will depend on the scheme you are running.

For the Wide Zone play, also commonly called Stretch or just outside zone… (never say that to the wide zone disciples though lol)  You will have the offensive lineman target the play side armpit/shoulder of the play side defender.  The offensive lineman should take an aggressive lateral step to accomplish this block.  The second step will typically split the crotch of the defender and will also be the step in which contact is made with the defensive lineman.  While keeping his shoulders square the blocker will fight to keep his head outside the defenders head and run him in a lateral direction.  The great thing about stretch blocks is often the blockers are working in tandem with another blocker, so if the defender goes inside, or is easily reached, the adjacent lineman can over take him.  This is a take what the defense gives reach.  Most defenders are taught not to get reached, so they will fight outside, allowing for creases to open in the defense.  You will find that stretch blocks work best against defenses that are well coached and do a good job of playing technique.

For Inside Zone, the initial step is still a lateral step, but the blocker will target the play side number of the play side defender.  Just as with the Wide Zone, the second step should split the defenders crotch and will be the step in which contact is made.  As the name of the play would suggest, the ball is going to hit inside the tackles unless the defense is on a stunt and gives away the flank.  Here the emphasis is more on forcing the play side defenders OUT, so the ball can hit in the interior of the defensive front.

Examples of Stretch Blocking:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KJmAv9f19Tw

TRADITIONAL REACH

The tradition reach block is frequently used by teams running speed sweep, speed option or a traditional toss out of the backfield.  The goal of the offensive lineman here is to capture the outside shoulder of the defender so the ball carrier can get outside.  The first step will be a hard lateral step that gains ground both laterally and vertically.  The step should be between 20 and 45 degrees depending how wide the defender is.  The second step will try to step on the play side toes of the defender with the back hand attacking the play side number.  Once contact is made, the blocker will try and turn his shoulders to pin the defender inside.  Every play side offensive lineman will be taking the same first step, this allows for any slants or stunts to be picked up by uncovered lineman, so they can then, use the same techniques as the covered lineman.

Examples of Traditional Reaching:

RIP AND RUN

The Rip and Run is most commonly seen by teams using a true Outside Zone scheme.  It looks like a mad rush by the offense to get to the edge of the defense.  I feel that the rip and run is best utilized by teams that run the rocket toss and the quick bubble/smoke screens. (not the read/RPO variants) The Rip and Run is probably my favorite reach scheme when I am not specializing in the Wide Zone.  It has been my experience that in order to stop the Rip and Run scheme, somebody on the defense has to cheat, which will open up your inside run game nicely.

For the Rip and Run, the first step of the blocker will be a hard open step that gains a good chuck of grass. The second step will try to get outside of the defenders play side foot. The blocker will then rip with his back arm and run as hard as he can in order to get outside of the defender.  If the blocker can clear the defender, he will then climb up-field and look inside for linebackers chasing the play.  By this point, the ball should be outside of the down lineman.  If the blocker cannot clear the defender, he will lean into his rip and continue to run the defender on his path.  This should be a “Race” to the sideline for the offensive lineman, a term that I borrowed from Coach Nate Albaugh.  Simply using the word “race” will help your blockers understand what you want accomplished here.  It should almost look like the offensive lineman are pulling, in fact some teams will indeed pull any lineman that are uncovered for a Rip and Run scheme.

Examples of Rip and Run:

TEACHING THE REACH BLOCK

Stance and Starts

The most important aspect of the reach block will always be the first step.  This the step that will get the offensive lineman’s head across the face of the defender and allow for proper placement of the second step.  The best way to drive this step into muscle memory is with a drill I call Stance and Starts.  The players will all line up facing the OL coach and get into a stance.  The players will use this drill to repeatedly take the first step and get back into a stance.  This is a high tempo drill.  The step that you will use will reflect what your primary reach scheme is.  So, if you are a Wide Zone team, they will take a hard lateral step. The OL coach will use a cadence of “hand down, set hut, hand down, set hut, hand down, set hut”.  You want as many reps as possible in each direction.  Your players will get lazy at first and try to use bad technique and miss reps, stop immediately and correct this before continuing.  Once you are satisfied with the steps in each direction, you can incorporate two steps, and eventually firing off the ball to put it all together.

Reach Drill

Here is where you can work the skills and technique needed for the individual blocks.  Again, what you emphasize, will be dictated by the specific scheme that your offense is utilizing.  Focus on what your team does.  Organize your offensive lineman into two single file lines facing the coach.  Then take two players and have them turn around and face the lines.  The lines will be your blockers, the two guy you have turned around, will be your dummy defenders.   The dummy guy will align based on what you will see that week from your opponent. You can have the dummy guy hold bags if you desire.  The two lines will be reaching in opposite directions, one, then the other.  The OL coach will stand in the middle facing the blockers so he can watch the first step and then hand placement and pad level of the blockers.

The idea here is to make the drill harder than what it will be in the game, and to reinforce the need for them to run their feet.  To do this the tempo will need to be high, and the dummy guy must work outside on the “hut” to force the blocker to run his feet to get his head outside.

Combo Drill (zone)

The Combo drill is a great drill for zone scheme teams.  You will set this up exactly the same as the Reach Drill, except you will have two blockers going the same direction to simulate a covered/uncovered tandem.  The covered man will use the appropriate zone technique, and the uncovered will attempt an overtake.  You can have the dummy guy work inside or outside now.  As the technique and skill of your blockers improves, you can start adding linebackers into this drill to simulate in game scenarios.

CLOSING

Whatever variant of the Reach Block your offense is utilizing, it is an essential skill for your offensive lineman to be able to accomplish.  Outflanking your opponent will always be a sound game plan.  This holds true in almost any sport, and in combat as well.  Spend the time necessary to develop this skill and your offense will reap the benefits, after all… a defense that cannot keep contain, is no defense at all!  Follow me on twitter here @thecoachvogt and be sure to subscribe to my email list to be updated any time a new article drops!

Running Effective Football Practices

Football season is here!  Summer has been filled with hard work, sweat and hours of scheming for offensive and defensive installations.  However, how much thought has been put into establishing effective and efficient practices?  I am a firm believer in the fact that games are won and lost Monday through Thursday!  These are the days in which we prepare our teams for the coming game.  Practice too short or waste time in practice, you will be unprepared.  Spend too long at practice and you risk being burnt out by Friday or negatively effecting moral.  It really is an art, to run a proper football practice.  The purpose of this article is to shed some light on this and provide a guide for running a “good” practice.  While I do not claim to have the perfect system here, it has proven to be effective for me and the teams that I have coached for.

SAFETY

Let’s start with the obvious and get it out of the way now.  Football, when played well, is an aggressive contact-filled game.  Because of the nature of the game there are possibilities for injuries.  Such injuries, and in particular injuries of a serious nature, can be minimized by playing with the rules, wearing proper equipment, and using the proper techniques for your position as taught by your position coach.

Special attention should be paid to the proper head, neck and body position when blocking and tackling.  The use of the head as a weapon in blocking and tackling is not only against the rules, but spearing techniques can be the cause of serious injury to yourself or your opponent.  A well-conditioned football player, using correct techniques, with his body in the correct heads-up, bull-necked football position, greatly reduces his chances of injury. In fact, FOOTBALL IS SAFER TODAY THAN IT EVER HAS BEEN IN THE HISTORY OF THE SPORT!

BASIC PRACTICE GUIDE LINES

  • Pay strict attention to time segments.
  • All segments are important, treat them as such.
  • Breed confidence and success into your team.
  • Gain respect from your players, do not demand it. You must earn it.
  • If you get tired pray for strength, because you should practice at a high tempo and you must have the same energy you ask your players to have.

You should also be very selective in the drills in which you select for your players to do.  All of your drills should do the following:

  • Cover considerable ground in a short amount of time.
  • Be well planned and administered.
  • Be known by name to the players so that they do not require re-explanation after they have been run two or three times.

Do not make drills too elaborate.  Keep them short, snappy, crisp and positive.  The coach running the drills should see to it that they are prepared in ADVANCED.  This should include any teaching aids such as balls, bags, cones and etcetera.  When establishing your football drills you need to choose from the following four types of drills:

  1. Fundamental Drills – these are to teach all the skills of tackling, blocking, stance, etc.
  2. Reaction Drills – primarily for developing quickness, balance, and agility.  These should be included briefly in almost every practice.
  3. Toughening Drills – the primary purpose here is to develop and encourage the desire and ability to utilize the physical contact aspect of the game of football.   These drills should be used only to the extent so as not to dull the desire for further contact.
  4. Fun Drills – used to lighten the practice load late in the season or as a morale booster.

Do all these things, and your practices will set your players up for success on and off the field.  As I said earlier, it is my belief that many teams lose the game on Mondays through Thursdays because they do not know how to properly practice and prepare.

THE OBJECTIVE OF PRACTICE

  1. Mental Toughness – this can be developed and is expected.
    1. Learn to deal with pain and to never except defeat. Do all the little things right all the time.
    2. Defeat all negative thoughts. “When your body says no – your heart says go!”
  2. Physical Strength and Quickness
    1. Weight Room – Benefits are well known, this is where championships are won, and champions lift IN season!
    2. Agility, Adaptability and Flexibility.
  3. Intensity – Must teach the 150% attitude
    1. Everything is done with a high level of enthusiasm and competitiveness – Push each other.
    2. Never be satisfied.
    3. All-out effort – All the time – 150% effort every minute accept nothing less.
    4. Expect more from yourself as coaches and players.
  4. Unity – Only as good as the last coach or last player with the merit role in the program.
    1. Always talk “Us” and “We”, not “I” and “Me”. Make being on the team the greatest experience of their lives.
    2. Hard work together equals Unity of Team. Encourage each other to work harder – the harder you work, the harder it is to surrender.
  5. The Difference between Them and Us.
    1. We do work harder, 150% effort all the time – Outwork the 110% opponent.
    2. Discipline – must live with it, must expect it, must do right 150% of the time.
    3. If a 150% effort equals hard work, then we can accomplish it.
    4. As a team we will sweat the small stuff. The little things we do will make us Champions.
    5. Our Success – Our Attitude – Our Work Habits are things we can control, choose to be in control of our destiny. Never allow our opponent to dictate our destiny.

CONDITIONING

A note on conditioning. It is my personal belief that drills done for the sole purpose of condition are largely, a huge waste of time.  To me, if you have to do drills just for the purpose of conditioning your players, it means you are NOT practicing hard enough.  Let me say this now, YOU SHOULD BE ABLE TO PRACTICE INTO SHAPE!

Your practices need to be run at a high tempo.  Once your players are familiar with your drills, they should be rapid fire and you need to coach on the fly.  Save the slowed down teaching for pre and post practice, or in those situations in which immediate correction is non-negotiable.  When it comes to conditioning, there are certain drills that will allow you to do this AND have your players get meaningful reps at the same time!  Here are some such drills:

Edge Period– This will be the starting offense minus the wide outs against the starting defense minus the secondary.  The offense will choose one formation and attack the edge to the left and then to the right as fast as possible with the same play over and over.  This conditions both sides of the ball, and forces the players to communicate with each other quickly under pressure.  Yes the defense will know the play and inevitably start cheating…. It will make you tougher, get over it.  The ball carriers will be on a quick whistle, no tackling to the ground.  Do this drill on Mondays.

Inside Run– Everybody knows what inside run is.  Increase the tempo, tackle to the ground, get after it!  Do this drill on Tuesdays.  “Tuesday is Bruise Day!”

Man Drill– This drill is where the wide outs and defensive backs can go during edge period and inside run.  They will work on man coverage.  This needs to be high tempo.  No ball needs to be thrown here.  Work four wide receivers at a time against four defensive backs.  They will work normal routs for three to four second goes.  If the wide out gets separation, then he wins.  If the defensive back stays manned up, then he wins.  Work about ten reps in a row before switching.  Communicate the routes with the wide outs in the fastest manner your system has, I find the best is to have all the wide outs run the same route.

Pursuit Drill– Ah, pursuit drill.  The most overly complicated drill in existence.  No other drill seems to have so many complicated ass ways of doing it.  It’s really not necessary.  Here is a highly effective pursuit drill that is also super simple.  I call it “Fire Ant” because you want your defense swarming the football like a bunch of fire ants.  Here is out it works:  you will have six cones, three on each side line.  One on the goal line, one on the ten, and one on the twenty on each side of the field.  The defense will be on the goal line in the middle of the field.  A coach will snap a ball as a faux center and the defense will step to their run fits or pass drops based off the second defensive coach’s action and start chopping their feet.  The second defensive coach will then point to a sideline and yell out the number one, two or three.  The defense will then turn sprint to that cone, break it down on that cone as a unit, and then run back and get set for the next rep.   Repeat as much desired before switching to next group.  Simple stuff.  Do this drill daily.  Put them on a timer to get there and back and set by!

Screens and PA Period– This drill is an offensive drill done while the defense does pursuit drill.  The starting offense will be on the ball on the thirty yard line going in and the entire back up core will be lined up about ten yards behind them.  The OC will call a screen or a play action pass.  (have bags set up for land marks for your screens)  The offense will then execute the call and every single person, starters and backups will sprint to the goal line and back once the ball has been caught.  On screens make sure the OL and other blockers run to the land mark before running to the goal line.  Do this drill daily.

PRACTICE SCHEDULE (with explanations)

Let’s assume that you start practice at 3:00 PM for the following example of a practice schedule:

2:45 – Pre Practice: This is where install should be as well as stance work or lineman, ball security, extra snaps, chute work, technique teachings and etcetera. 

3:00 – Team Stretch: Another thing that people tend to really over complicate.  It shouldn’t be a production.  If it takes you more than ten minutes, you’re doing it wrong.  They should be loosened up from pre practice anyways.

3:05 – Special Teams: Work Punt and PAT first at same time, every day!  Every day means every day!

3:20 – Individual Period: Get after it.  Use a high tempo

3:40 – Skelly: Ten minutes for both offense and defense

4:00 – Edge Period:  As described earlier in article.   Tuesday will be inside run. Wednesday blitz pick up.

4:10- Team D

4:30 – Team O

4:50 – SPP: Screens, PA, Pursuit

5:00 – DONE

NOTE:  If you can, have a trainer with a blow horn, use the horn to mark the start of every new period based on the schedule above.  This will help keep all groups on schedule and prevent from losing track of time!

NOTE:  For the sake of productivity, have water placed with each position group.  This way they can grab a quick swig at natural transition periods without having to leave group.  Each position coach can also control when they send their unit for water.  Also, the water they drink during practice doesn’t really help, its more of a mental and physical break than a need for water.  Coaches need to constantly push the need to drink as much as possible between practices.

This is a two hour and fifteen minute practice when you count the pre practice period.  This is probably the perfect amount of practice time.  Long enough to done what is needed, but short enough to keep tempo at a high pace and keep moral high. Below I will provide an example of a practice template:

practice template

This is a generic template anyone can find online. I’m simply providing it to you so all your coaches can be on the same page.  Obviously you can label the sections as you see fit.  The purpose here is simply to provide a template.  You can put this on a document such as google share and have all your coaches fill in what they will be doing then print it out each day and every coach will know what every coach is doing and when!

CLOSING

As practice begins in the next few days, take some time to consider how we are practicing and purpose that it serves.  Is your practice structured in a manner that provides a clear purpose?  If you can’t easily answer yes, then you should consider changing things.  I will never claim to have all the answers, or that this is the end all be all of practice templates… but it’s a pretty good start.   Subscribe to my email list so you can be notified whenever a new article comes out!  Follow me on twitter at @thecoachvogt and also check out the following EBooks:  “Installing the Wide Zone” and “The Speed-T Offense”.