football plays

The Speed-T: A Sneak Peak

The traditional Wing-T offense was developed in the early 1950’s by Coach Tubby Raymond at the University of Delaware.  Since then, the Wing-T concepts have permeated every single offense in the country from youth to the NFL. The principals of this offense are visible in zone based offenses, gap based offenses and even spread offenses.

The Wing-T is much more than a style of play, it is systematic way of attacking a defense. The very nature of the offense means that if the defense takes away one play, they are leaving themselves open for its companion play.

The Speed-T offense takes these concepts one step further.  The traditional Wing-T bases everything off of series, the Buck Sweep series, the Belly series and the Lead series.  The Speed-T takes these principles and simplifies them into basing the offense off of one singular play that will place considerable stress on the defense.  That Play is the Speed Sweep.

As I stated in my previous book “Installing the Wide Zone”, I am not here to give you a bunch of fluff.  I don’t want to tell you stories or waste your time with anecdotes and jokes.  My goal here is to provide a no frills, gimmick free, easy to read, and easy to apply system that you can install right now and start running the offense.  Everything will be straight forward, detailed in an efficient manner, and discernable for practical application.

There are a lot of offenses one can choose to run these days, and even more plays to choose from to be a part of that offense.  I a firm believer in “less is more” especially when it comes to football.  I believe every team from the peewees to the NFL can benefit from a condensed playbook.  Choose only one or two plays to base your offense from and have a companion play for each of those to bring to a total of NO MORE than four plays.  The Speed-T offense will base itself off of the Speed Sweep, let’s find out why by taking a look at Chapter One of “The Speed-T Offense”.

Part 1: Why the Speed-T

Why someone would choose the Speed-T offense for their team are many.  Utilizing the Speed sweep as a base play will take the advantages of the traditional Wing-T and amplify them.  Here is a look at how it accomplishes this feat:

  • Speed to the Edge
    • The Speed Sweep has the innate ability to get to the edge of the formation with great speed. By the time the ball is snapped the speed back is running full speed and gets the ball in stride.  Within 2 two to three steps he is on the edge, forcing the defense to react immediately or risk being out flanked.  There is no time for the defense to be cute and try and disguise what they are doing.  They most do it now.  Often they will do it pre-snap, showing their hand and exposing weakness based off your motion.
  • Numbers on the Flank
    • The formations of the Speed-T offense allow for extra run gaps to be created while still posing a vertical passing threat. This creates a natural conundrum for the defense. They can load the box and expose themselves to the Play Action game, they can defend the edges and give up the quick hitting inside game, or they can try and run down the speed sweep while defending inside gaps.  Most defenses will try the latter option as a game plan, which will allow you to chew them up four and five yards at a time, even with slow backs.  I don’t know about you, but I would do that all season.
  • Angles
    • The use of angles may be the single biggest advantage of this offense! Your blockers, OL or Skills, will never have to drive a defender backwards, they will always have an angle to their blocks. This allows you to use smaller or less athletic linemen and still be successful.  The entire system is based on taking what the defense is not defending, and getting there with as much speed and simplicity as possible.
  • Defensive Backs in Conflict
    • The extra run gaps created by the formations in the Speed-T offense will force the secondary players into run fits. You want to force the DB’s to make tackles.  When they start to play the run first, instead of the pass, now you can call the play action for a go ahead and score.
  • Companion Plays
    • Companion Plays are plays that are designed to look like the base play, but in reality are going to a different ball carrier or hitting a different spot. The companion plays to the Speed Sweep will infuriate Defensive Coordinators as they are quick hitting C gap to A gap runs that get fast easy yards into the heart of the defense.  The defense CAN NOT defend both.  They must make a choice.  The good DC’s will keep you guessing, but this can be mitigated with a check system we will talk about later.
  • Easy Rule System
    • Your Offensive Linemen will only have three possible rules in the run game. Yes, that is correct, just three.  They will have Reach, Gap, or Pull.  This allows them to play fast because they know the rule system in and out.  The rule system is also designed to place the blockers in positions that set them up for success so they gain confidence in the offense and their role.
  • 3 Ball Carriers
    • You have three possible ball carriers on any given play that the defense has to defend. If you incorporate the QB as a runner then the defense has to account for four ball carriers.  This forces the defense to spread itself thin by allocating defenders for each possible ball carrier.  Add in the fact that backs not getting the ball will be carrying out fakes, and you have a nightmare situation for the defense.
  • Sustained Success
    • History is on the side of the T based offenses. Most other offense produce “flash in the pan” success.  They will be good for a year, two years, and then back to obscurity.  While the teams that run a T based offense are consistently good, regardless of talent levels.  I don’t need to convince you of this, simply think of the successful teams in your state, or district.  Good chance the ones with sustained success are ones basing out of T concepts
  • Win with Lack of Talent
    • This goes back to the sustained success. Why does this happen?  It is in the way that the system works.  Blockers have numbers and angles.  The ball carries all carry out fakes taking defenders with them.  Companion plays work off each other to keep each play viable.
  • Easy to Call Plays
    • The Speed-T is an extremely easy system to call plays in. Implementing count systems and identifying who makes the tackle tells you what play to call.  It is an If/Then offense.  If the defense does this, then I do that.  It is very simple and keeps the defense from focusing on one portion of your attack.
  • It’s New Again
    • As a Speed-T guy, you will be the new kid on the block. You will be different.  People will not know how to line up one you or be sure how to defend you.  Your offense will be different than any other team, and those teams will be used to lining up on spread, four wide receiver sets all year long.  They will only have three days to prepare for you the week that they play you.

The Speed-T offense will allow you to take advantage of several factors.  You will be able to stress the defense with an edge attack that rapidly stretches the defense out.  You can use the edge attack to set up a punishing and quick hitting inside run game.  Then you can attack the defense with a complete passing series to take advantage of the defense when it sells out on the run game.  All of these things work together to make a complete offensive system.

CLOSING

Keep an eye out for the release, it will be happening very soon!  Give me a follow on twitter here @thecoachvogt and subscribe to my email list to be updated any time I release a new article!

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Why Go Wide? A look into “Installing the Wide Zone”

This article is a preview of my exclusive ebook: “Installing the Wide Zone“. It is the only resource available that comprehensively covers full installation of the system as an offensive scheme.  You will have access to drills, diagrams, change ups, and how to block the play against different fronts.

Installing the Wide Zone” is a complete guide to installing, applying and running the wide zone play, the most consistent play in football today! The book will cover philosophical applications, coaching points, drill work and change ups. This comprehensive guide is complete with diagrams for blocking different fronts, how to establish and carry out the drills necessary for the success of the play, and how to get the most out of your offense by using the wide zone system. Take your offense to the next level and incorporate the most consistently productive offensive system ever developed in the game of football!

Blocking the wide zone is very easy in concept, but requires a lot of patience, discipline, and repetitions.  So why commit to something that takes so much effort in order to run correctly?  Let’s see why:

  • It’s safe
    • You are blocking a zone instead of a man, or a gap. Each zone is accounted for by the adjacent lineman.  The lateral movement of the offensive line eliminates penetration by the defensive line.
    • It is effective against stunts and pressures. Because the zones move laterally you will find that stunts and blitzes are picked up naturally by your blockers.  This makes blitzing extremely dangerous for the defense.  Once the stunt is picked up, the runner is up and in the secondary!  There is no DB in the nation that likes to see a free running ball carrier bearing down on them.
    • No 1st level penetration. The lateral movement by the offense means that the defense line also has to move lateral or risk being overtaken.  An up field step by the down lineman results in being cut off from their assigned gap.  The use of double teams up front also forces the DL to choose; flow, or be cut off.
  • It forces the defensive front to be disciplined
    • The flow of the offense forces lineman and linebackers to maintain gap integrity and flow with the play. If just one man is not fast enough or is too fast you will have running lanes open for the ball carrier.
  • It places defenders into conflicts
    • The linebackers are taught to flow and pursue… yet doing so will cause them to get washed by the play as it cuts up behind them. The backside LBs are taught watch the cut back… but this is a cut UP play.  They will hang back and be cut off by the climbing OL.
    • The defensive line is taught not to get reached. They fight outside and the play will cut up behind them.  If they try and jump inside to stop the cut up by the back, the back takes an outside path and the offense captures the edge.
    • The secondary will be forced to make plays in the run game. This naturally puts them in a huge conflict with their assignment.  Do they play safe and let the ball carrier chew up yards? Do they come up to support the run game and give up the pass?
  • It takes what the defense gives
    • The movement of the offense takes the defenders on the path they are choosing to go. The defender will feel like they are fighting leverage.
    • This allows less athletic lineman to block much better athletes on the defense. Let’s face it, as far as linemen go, the best athletes almost always play defensive line, and now we are asking the guys not good enough to play defensive line to go block them.  Why not use a system in which the OL can use the DL’s natural athleticism and ability against him? Your OL only has to be willing to do one thing, RUN! (which we will dive into later)
    • Do not have to drive defenders off the ball. This is a big misconception with wide zone.  We are not trying to set the edge, we are trying to stretch the defense out!  If the defense gives us the edge we will take it and a big play will ensue, this happens when the defense becomes frustrated at being chewed up in between the tackles on a play that looks like an outside run.
  • Limitless complementary actions
    • You can use the same blocking scheme up front for change ups, motions, back field actions, play fakes and options. All this, without changing rules for the offensive line.
  • Universal progression
    • A TE can play center. A guard can play tackle. A center can play TE.  Every rule is the same for all offensive linemen.  They all practice the same techniques and drills.  This makes the play by its very nature, extremely injury resistant.  If somebody gets injured, you can move a starter to the edge or to center and put an inexperienced guy at guard where he is protected.

By incorporating the wide zone into your offense you will accomplish a few things.  You will have a base offense to use each week.  You may have a change up or two, but your “offense” will be the same week in and week out.  You will have a scheme that your team has master’s degrees in.  They will be confident in the play because they have run it a thousand times that week.  They know they can block anything the defense throws at them because they have had the answers drilled into them.  They don’t need to think, or analyze, they can just go play ball.

You will have an offense that can control tempo.  Whether you are a face melting spread team or a team that likes to get into 21 and 22 personnel.  You will have a system that can control the tempo with a consistent and effective ground game that stays in front of the chains. Staying in front of the chains avoids the dreaded 3rd and long.  3rd in long gets you stopped.  To many gets you beat.

You can now focus on manipulating the defense with formations.  Because you can run this play from any formation and any personnel set, you can develop as many formations as your heart desires.  This prevents the defense from practicing against your scheme, and forces them to practice lining up correctly all week long.

You will avoid becoming too scheme heavy.  Having to jump from scheme to scheme makes you fundamentally unsound.  This also leads to illogical progressions.  Switching from scheme to scheme cuts down on practice time.  You can only practice each scheme so much, then factor in each scheme vs multiple fronts. You will simply run out of time.  Having too many concepts also causes lineman to become tentative because they are unsure of the answer.  They develop paralysis by analysis.  By limiting your schemes you give your lineman the necessary repetitions in practice to be confident and play with reflex speed instead thinking speed.

CLOSING

Installing the Wide Zone” might be the key ingredient your offensive is looking for this season!  Eliminate negative plays and be sound against anything the defense tries to throw at you.  Don’t waste any more time and grab your self a copy now!   subscribe to my email list to be updated anytime I post an article and follow me here on twitter @thecoachvogt.

 

Find Your Number 1!

“I fear not the man who knows 10,000 kicks.  I fear the man who has practiced 1 kick 10,000 times!” -Bruce Lee-

punch

Roy Jones Jr, Rocky Marciano, Joe “Brown Bomber” Lewis, and Floyd Mayweather. What do they all have in common?  Other than being phenomenal fighters, they all are known for the straight right hand.  you know its coming, its their best and most frequently used punch.  They throw it all the time, and they land it.  Why?  Lets look at wrestling and Olympian and NCAA champion Jon Smith.  The low single is coming, no doubles, no ankle picks, no throws.  Just the low single, and guess what? He is going to get it and take his opponent down.

These legendary athletes were never hard to scout.  Every fan in the stands or watching from home knows exactly what is coming.  The problem is, its coming from all types of angles.  All types of looks.  All types of different scenarios.  It must be defended at all times.  The opponent must be sound against it in all aspects of his game plan!

The point that I am trying to make here is that all of the greats find what they are good at, believe in it and rep it thousands of times!  How does this apply to football you might ask; well I as you this, HOW DOES IT NOT?!  I can tell you now, that when I am scouting a team that we will play, I never get nervous when I see a plethora of different blocking schemes.  More often than not they are mediocre at all of them and if you stop one, one time they illogically jump to another scheme. Want to know what makes me nervous?  When I scout a team and they run 2 or 3 plays, and they run them over, and over, and over.  They have PhD.’s in those plays. They come from all different formations, from multiple looks. What makes it worse is if their number 2 or number 3 plays look just like number 1!  That is a nightmare!

system

I’m sure all of you can think of somebody you play that is like this. Some real life examples I can give are Bishop Moore in Orlando, FL and Gold Beach in Gold Beach, OR.  It is no secret the speed sweep is coming when you play Bishop Moore.  You are going to have to stop it.  Not once, twice or three times; but all night long.  You will have to stop it and be sound against it from multiple formations, looks and set ups.  Its coming, and its coming frequently.  In Gold Beach you better be ready for the veer!  Its coming, right at you.  You may stop it, but guess what?  It is coming again, and again, and again.  To quote the head coach for Gold Beach @kdawgswift “You better buckle up peckerwood, because we are gunna run it till you bleed to death!”  (still one of my favorite quotes of all time lol)

So, what constitutes a good number 1 play?  Your number 1 play should meet these criteria in order to be considered as your go to play:

  • Must be able to run it out of any formation
  • Must be able to run it out of any personnel group
  • Must stress the defense in multiple facets (assignments, techniques, alignment)
  • Must be gap sound against all defensive fronts
  • Must have a companion play that constraints the number 1 play while looking the same
  • Must run it religiously

Here are my top recommendations for number 1 plays in no particular order, beneath each play I provided example(s) of good companion plays:

  • Jet Sweep
    • belly, inside zone, GTO, trap
  • Wide Zone
    • dive, inside zone, GTO, keeper, load and speed option
  • Power O
    • jet sweep, power read, GTO
  • Trap
    • jet sweep, GTO
  • Veer
    • mid line, trap, GTO
  • Mid Line
    • veer, trap, GTO
  • Inside Zone
    • wide zone, keeper, GTO
  • Belly/BellyG
    • jet sweep, toss, buck sweep, GTO

DISCLAIMER: GTO is in there a lot.  Everyone should be able to run some counter…. BUT; counter is a set up play,  not a play you live and die by.  Many a teams have learned this the hard way…

CLOSING

This article follows along the lines of two of my previous articles “Whats Your System” and  “A Systemic Attack”.  KISS is my general coaching philosophy, and most teams that adopt this approach tend to experience success.  By doing this are you going to go win a state title???  Well, if you do please give me all the credit!  All joking aside, I can say this: If you simplify, results get better, period.  Subscribe to my email list to be notified when ever a new article is published and follow me on twitter here @thecoachvogt.

 

The Lost Art of the 4 Minute Offense

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It is one of the saddest things I see happen to football teams, and I see it happen just about every week during football season.  I can guarantee most of you have as well.  You have a football team who has possession of the football, has the lead, and there are 3 minutes or so left on the clock. What happens next I find sad and unfortunate for the players of this team.  The offense, in its own infatuation with as many plays as possible, as many points as possible ends up getting stopped while only using up 30 to 40 seconds of clock.  The other team’s offense takes the field with 2:30 seconds and 2 to 3 time outs left, and proceeds to go down the field, score, and win the game.  Had the first team simply slowed down, even if they snap the ball fewer times, still got stopped, but used up 1:30 to 2:30 seconds of clock, it would be much more likely for their own defense to seal the win for them.  Now the other team fields their offense with 30 seconds to 1 minute left, now they have to resort to big plays and/or trick plays.

In this situation, traditional knowledge and coaching would dictate that you grind out the clock.  What I mean by that, is you take your time between snaps, you call plays that will keep the clock running, and utilize formations that allow you to call these plays regardless of defensive look. You might be a spread tempo team, and I’m not here to talk you out of your belief system and doing what you do.  Lots of teams win lots of games running spread, and going fast.  What I am here to do is make a case for the 4 minute offense!

WHY THE 4 MINUTE OFFENSE

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At some point it is going to happen.  There is no way around it. It is going to happen whether you like it or not.  YOU WILL HAVE TO LINE UP AND PLAY NASTY BALL! It may be down on the goal line, it could be 4th and short, it might be raining and spitting nasty weather, or you may have to chew up some clock to win the game. When this happens, you better be able to buckle up, get under center and do some gut punching! I am a firm believer that every team should have the ability to take snaps under center, and here is why:

  • The QB wedge and Fullback wedge. Its quick, its dirty, it gets first downs.  First downs turn to touch downs.
  • The path of the running backs are more downhill and aggressive in nature.
  • For your play actions and misdirection plays, the QB has his back to the defense

I am also a firm believer that everyone should have the ability to get into 21 and 22 personnel, and here is why:

  • It creates extra run gaps/lanes for the ball carriers.
  • It brings more bodies to the point of attack.
  • It makes it more difficult for the defense to outnumber you on the edges or in the box.
  • It is both physically and mentally tough on the defense, especially the defensive backs.
  • Easy to get into unbalanced formations

FINDING PERSONNEL

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I know, I know…. I hear some of you already.  “We just don’t have those type of guys coach.”  Well sit down, because you may not like what comes next.  That excuse is a nothing more than a cop out.  Everybody has those guys.  Be a dang coach and get them in the right spots.  The perceived lack of “guys” for a spot has nothing to do with players, and everything to do with coaches.  Period.  You have them I promise.  We are not here to cater to the desires of 14 to 18 year old kids.  We are here to build men of character, provide guidance, promote education, develop relations, and win games (yes this should be last).  Here is where you can find your tight ends and full backs:

  • Defensive lineman, use the non-starters, or use the starters if 21/22 is just going to be a special situation offense for you.
  • Linebackers, same deal as the D-Line
  • Bigger bodied wide outs
  • Back up offensive linemen
  • Bigger bodied running backs

WHAT PLAYS TO RUN

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The best part about the 4 minute offense, is you do not need to change any of your base concepts. The running game that is prevalent in the spread offense all have roots in 2 back formations.  You can call the same plays.  The rules for your offensive lineman will not change.  You are simply using personnel to create more gaps, and bring more bodies to the point of attack so you can chew up yards and eat clock.   Below I will diagram the most common spread running plays out of 22 personnel.

Inside Zone:

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Power O:

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Wide Zone:

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Counter GT:

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Isolation:

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CLOSING

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The 4 minute offense seems to be a lost art.  The ego that point averages seem to create is leading many coaches astray from basic game strategy concepts.  In the end, only one average matters.  The average amount of times you take the field and leave with a W! It is like I previously stated, every single team needs to have the ability to get under center and get in 22/21 personnel.  Regardless of your base offensive scheme.  The best modern example of this is the New England Patriots.  They are 4 and 5 wide 90 to 95 percent of the time.  However, when it is time to put the game away, they are undoubtedly the best 22/21 personnel team I have ever seen.  They have no qualms about jumping into 2 back sets, getting Brady under center and gut punching the defense all the way down the field.  Subscribe to my email list so you can be updated whenever a new article posts, and follow me on twitter here @thecoachvogt.

 

The Lost Art of Belly

“The fear of the belly, makes all other plays indefensible.”

Few things make defensive coaches pull out their hair quite like the good ole Belly.  It’s a quick hitting, power play that takes advantage of the natural weakness of the C gap.  Defenses are forced to declare when they are committing to stopping the belly.  It is difficult to lose yards because the speed in which the play hits.  When committing to stopping the belly, the defense will leave themselves open to all other plays.  The belly is a great set up play for other run plays, but specifically toss, jet and counter match up with the belly almost seamlessly, and the play action game off belly can be devastating!

BELLY HISTORY

“Belly” refers to the action of the quarterback and the fullback in which the quarterback will ride the fullback’s path with ball in his belly.  First implemented by Bobby Dodd at Georgia Tech in the 1950s out of the “T” formation.  By the 1970s the belly had evolved to an entire series complete with companion plays.  You have Belly Dive (IZ), Belly G, Belly Option and even Belly Stretch (WZ).  The most common application of the belly is the Belly G, any wing-t guy worth his salt runs the Belly G religiously.  But these fellows are becoming less and less common.  The belly is becoming a lost art, it is not seen often, if at all in some areas of the country.

THE BASICS

Regardless of the variant being run, the footwork between the QB and FB will always be the same.  The QB will reverse out and step flat down the line to intercept the path of the FB and put the ball in his belly.  The FB will take a flat step, a crossover step and then step down hill at the tackles outside leg for an aim point.  It is important that the fullback keeps his shoulders square during the flat step and crossover step.  The tail back should do one of the following depending on your scheme/variant: carry out a fake (toss/jet), or get into pitch relationship with the QB.  Your quarter back should fake the option after handing the ball off if he is the mobile type.  For a more pro-style QB I like to have him fake a pass drop after he hands off the ball.

BELLY G

For the sake of this article we will focus on the most common variant is the Belly G.  The offensive line will scoop on the backside and gap block on the frontside. It is important to know that the playside tackle needs to gap all the way down to the A gap when a shade nose is present to help prevent penetration.  The playside guard will pull with a tight downhill path and kickout the playside edge defender, if the edge defender is spilling, the guard will log and pin him in so the FB can bounce.  If there is a wing to the playside then he will arc release and pin the playside linebacker, placing his head in front.  This variant in particular works extremely well in conjunction with a toss fake or a jet sweep fake.  Here is a diagram of Belly G vs a 50 front:

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Here are some film clips of Belly G:

BELLY COMPANIONS

If you are going to run the Belly G, I recommend you to have companions to go along with it.  When you effectively run the Belly G it will be so feared that the defense will clearly show you when they are selling out to stop it.  This fact makes it near impossible to stop your companion plays!  You will fake the Belly G and give the ball to a different back.  The fake does not have to be exact, it just needs to have the same initial action by the backs and OL to be highly effective.  Your companion plays should fall into 2 categories: same side companion, and opposite side companion.  Examples of same side plays would be jet sweep, toss and option.  Examples of opposite side plays would be counter and reverse.

Here are some examples of toss as a same side companion, toss is a great way to take advantage of edge players that are playing hard inside and spilling.  Take a look:

Here are a few examples of counter as an opposite side companion. Use counter when the defenses backside players are over pursuing to the playside. Take a look:

PLAY ACTION

Play action pass can be absolutely devastating off of a belly fake, especially when used in conjunction with formations that force the secondary into run fit responsibilities.  This places the defensive backs into a conundrum.  They must play the belly to support the run game, yet if they do, they leave open quick strike passing opportunities. The trick is to call them at the right moment.  Here are a few examples of what can happen when called at the correct moment:

CLOSING

The Belly Series is not something that has been common for some time.  But if you are in the search for that missing piece of your offense, it just may be the ticket.  Highly effective, quick hitting, multiple variants, and the ability to open up multiple set up plays.  If you wish to learn how to incorporate the belly into your current offense then check out the, TheCoachVogt.com installation page HERE where it is part of the Pro-T offensive series.  Follow me on twitter here @thecoachvogt and be sure to subscribe to the email list so you can be updated every time a new article is posted.

 

 

Simple Steps For Defending The Wing-T

After receiving feedback from my subscribers and followers, which you all know I love so much you guys are awesome motivation!  I decided to write a quick guide on How to soundly defend against the wing-T offense.  Anybody who has defended a disciplined Wing-T team knows how frustrating it can be.  They can seemingly move the ball down field in 3-5 yard chunks at will, even when you have athletes superior to theirs.  Its not necessarily the wing-T plays that allow them to do this.  It is how they manipulate the flanks, numbers, and angles to get more bodies than you have at the point of attack. What I have here are 6 simple steps to follow that will help you, at the least, be defensively sound.  For purposes of this article we will assume that the offense is NOT a triple option team, I will have a separate article for that soon.

STEP 1- Don’t Use An Even Front

I know, I know, all you coaches that live and die by 4-4, 4-3 and 4-2-5 are about to get up in arms, but please hear me out before you close the article.  If you run an even front you basically have 3 choices

  • Put the DE in a 7, and now your outflanked
  • Put the DE in a 9, what ever you do never, ever use a 3 and 9 against any run first team. The C gap is a natural weak spot as it is.
  • Use a 3, a 5 and walk the Sam down which forces you to walk out the Mike and now your middle is softened and you have taken away pursuit to the short side as well.

There is a reason offensive guys call TE-wing sets even killers.  A knowledgeable wing-T guy will force you into defensive looks you don’t want to be in 6 ways from Sunday. Save yourself the head aches and go to an odd front.  I prefer an under front as shown below:

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Here you can see we are gap sound, and the offense does not have us outflanked on either side.  The odd front allows us to balance up and force the offense to beat us man on man.

STEP 2-Have At Least 5 Guys On Each Side

Wing-T guys will always play the numbers game.  You will need at least 5 guys on each side of the formation to be sound.  Ill use the previous picture again to demonstrate:

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If you put a line down the center of the offense and defense you will see at least 5 on each side.  This rule will keep you sound in the numbers game and again force the offense to beat you man on man.

STEP 3-Never Leave The Weak B Gap Empty

You need a down lineman in the weak B gap, PERIOD!  If you don’t you will get Belly weak until the cows come home, if you start cheating the belly you get belly option.  Simply putting a down guy in B gap forces 2 things to happen.

  • The guard and tackle must base block the 3 and the 5 making the angle for the wing back insert extremely difficult.
  • The guard and tackle must “X” block the backside giving your edge player ample time to spill.

to defend the weak side trap your 3 tech will squeeze and spill just like an edge player would.  If he is getting trapped, find a new 3 tech, or tilt him so he can more effectively squeeze the down block by the guard.

If you get a double wing look, shift into a bear front.  This gives you 2 down guys in B gap and 2 guys on the wings to keep from being out flanked.  You can see that there are still 5 guys on each side of the ball as well.  Here is a photo:

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STEP 4-Beat On Up The Wings

The edge players will align head up on the wings.  They will step with inside foot and punch the wings while keeping eyes inside.  If the wing tries to block him it means 1 of 2 things.

  • Buck Sweep
  • Jet/Rocket sweep

When that wing tries to block him you will have your guy shove him straight backwards to take out a guard (hopefully the front side guard) on buck sweep, or to shed and pursue the jet/rocket sweep.  If the wing releases it’s the Belly G or Belly Option.  Either way, he will target the guard’s inside thigh to either create a pile, or a violent enough spill to make a play on the fullback. If the wing goes in motion away, he should be looking for waggle and counter coming back at him.

STEP 5-Eliminate Guard Kickouts

Step 4 touched on this briefly.  Wing T guys will do anything they can to get guards on your DBs.  Eventually its going to happen, but you can give your DBs the tools necessary to eliminate the guard kickout.  Just like the edge player targeted the inside thigh of the guard, the corner will too.  Looking for the same results.  Be careful however, if you coach in a place where the chop is not allowed you need to make sure that the players are not diving at the legs.  They need attack aggressively, then square shoulders to the LOS and use momentum and leverage to step hard inside and put the shoulder pad on the thigh pad.  Many times, the defender will remain on his feet while the guard either loses his balance or loses contact with the defender.  At the least you can create a nasty pile that the back has to bubble around which allows your defense to rally to the football.

STEP 6-Practice

If you have a wing-T team in your district or one you routinely schedule, then practice against wing-T sets at least once a week.

SHOT GUN WING-T

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If the offense has a QB…. This is the hardest wing-T set to defend.  First it takes you out of your odd look so you can cover the slot up. The QB can read the edge player, or can read the LB for RPOs or just keep it and hit the weak B gap if the LB chases the guard.  I would force the offense to run weak based on numbers.  I feel with the alignment shown above the offense has no choice but to run it weak. As far as defending the RPO, the OLB is going to beat the snot out of that slot player.  That is the most un-officiated part of the field, you will use that to your advantage and do what ever is necessary to prevent that slot from an inside release.  Knock him down, grab him do what you have to if you cant run with him.  I play a 1 high look because most gun guys will not throw that stop over and over…eventually they all get impatient and try for bomb…now you got them in long sticks, or even better… an interception or sack.

CLOSING

While not a complete answer to anything and everything a wing-T team can or will do, this is a very good set of rules to use when preparing for the offense.  As always scout what they do and when they do it, to have the greatest advantages you can. Here is the list of rules again

  1. No even fronts
  2. 5 on each side
  3. Never leave weak B gap empty
  4. Beat up the wings
  5. Eliminate guards
  6. Practice

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THE POWER of POWER O

Often referred to as “God’s Play”. Its physical, its downhill, brings bodies to the point of attack and can be downright punishing.  The edge defenders must be physical and mentally strong or risk being exposed. The Play I am referring to of course, is the Almighty, Power O.  The Power O is aptly named, and it is also one of the most versatile plays in the offensive world. Power O Can be run from any formation and personnel group, tagged with reads and assignment exchanges, and dressed up with formations, motions, fakes and trades.  All this done without changing rules for the offensive line, what’s not to love about that? There is only one other scheme that can replicate that kind of versatility, the zone play. This article will focus the basic blocking rules for the Power O against different fronts, the different variations, and how to dress the play up.

BASIC RULES

I love to run plays as a series, blame it on growing up with a Wing-T coach as father. I  pair the Power O with Widezone, because of this I want every player in the offense to make the first step of Power O look just like Widezone.  With that in mind, here are the general rules.

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QB-The QB will reverse out and sprint the ball back to the tailback. He will put the ball on the mid-line and keep his body clear for the back.  After the hand off the QB will carry out a 3-5 step burst opposite of the play for a boot fake. However, it is not just a fake, he is looking at the defensive edge player and checking him.  If that edge player is not checking the QB on boot, we will play action.

FB-The FB will take a path aiming at the inside leg of the tackle.  He is going to kick out the first man who shows on the tackles outside leg.  This rule accounts for any stunts and prevents the “I got my guy” quotes lol.  the FB will put his outside shoulder on the defensive players inside breast plate. We would love for him to destroy this player, but he really doesn’t have too.  Just getting a body on him quickly will suffice.

TB-The tailbacks first step will be as if he is running Widezone the opposite direction.  He will then go straight down the mid-line for the hand off.  The TB cannot come of the mid-line until his first step after the hand off.  He then takes a path to the C gap and is looking at the edge defender for a bounce or bang read.  He will bounce if the edge player spills and bang it in the C gap if he gets kicked.

PST & G-The play side offensive linemen will use the rule “gap to backer”.  They will step with their inside foot at any defender from their nose to the adjacent lineman’s nose.  The aim point for the gap defender is his near shoulder, placing the head in front to stop penetration. The blocker will try and wash the defender inside. If nobody is in his gap, his first step will be an inside step to clear any stunts into the gap and then he will go to the “BACKSIDE” linebacker and seal him off. This rule also applies to the tight end, with one caveat. If the C gap defender is shaded on the TE we will arc release him to the Sam or Safety. Here is an example:

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C-The center has to replace the pulling backside guard.  If there is an A gap defender he will gap block him with the same techniques as the play side linemen. If there is not a defender in his gap he will step flat down the line of scrimmage to wall off the 3tech, or 4i/4.  Penetration on the backside does not hurt this play, so he only needs to get his body on the defender to stop pursuit.

BSG-The backside guard is going to your puller.  I like an open pull because I want him to the point of attack as fast as possible. He will take a step that gains ground and opens his hips so he can run.  He is looking for the fullbacks block. If the fullback gets the kick, the guard will turn up and fit up on the play side linebacker. If the fullback gets spilled and pins the edge defender, the guard will bounce, then turn up and fit on the scraping play side linebacker.

BST and TE-The backside tackle and tight end have one have a rule called “pull check”.  On any defender shaded head up or inside they will step inside and then hinge to open hips and wall off the defender, again…backside penetration does not hurt the play, just get a body on him.  If the defender is in an outside shade, just base block him and wall him off.

DIFFERENT FRONTS & WHEN TO CALL POWER O

All of the base rules will never change, except for the TE’s. I will include here a quick description of when I like to call the play and what we do to a few different looks given by the defense.  I am a big Widezone guy, I also run a modified toss I call blast, as well as the bellyG.  All of these plays will eventually cause the defense to do one of two things, and often times both.

  • They will start overflowing with the play direction.
  • They will start slanting with the formation
    1. The thing about slanting is 9 times out of 10, you can dictate the slant by your formation. A film scout will tell you where they will go, as well as the first two series of the game. Then all you have to do is get them slanting the way you want.

Once the defense is slanting or flowing, preferably both, then it is time for Power O. Formation the defense in a manner that you know which way the slant is going. Call the Power O the opposite way of the slant/flow.  Power O is a gap scheme play, so your guys up front will just take them where they are going already! It makes for a very easy block, and you can wash them down across the formation most of the time, even with undersized lineman like I have. Here is an example vs a “Slant 50”

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You can see from the photo that the OL is just taking the DL for a ride.  The uncovered Guard will step down to check gap, then go wall off backside line backers. The ghost 9tech on the play side will be an easy kick for the fullback because he has been checking the QB all night on boot fakes (if he hasn’t…why aren’t you calling the keeper??)

If you are unsure about what direction the defense is slanting, get in a balanced formation and use the count system, which I take about here (LINK).  Just count the numbers and go where you have more than them. Simple math. Here is an example formation you could use:

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Occasionally you will get a gift for an alignment by the defense.  A 3tech and a 9tech to the strength.  Why anyone would do this, I will never understand, but when it happens from time to time. You can run the Power O as is or steal what they gave you, with a “solid” call.  If the tackle sees that the guard is covered and nobody is in the C gap he will call “Solid”.  This tells the FB he is on insert instead of kick, and tells the TE that he just needs to turn out on the 9tech. here is an example:

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Here it is vs a bear front:

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Blocking a play side 7tech can present some problems if he is a war daddy. I play with 7’s all the time, I like to keep them in a state of uncertainty. We will arc the TE to the Sam on Widezone away, cut block him with the TE on Widezone away, double team him, down block him, and on Power O to him, arc the TE to the Sam and kick him with the FB.  The 7tech, 9 times out of 10 will step with that TE and widen up, making an easy kick for the full back, here is a second look at it:

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VARIATIONS

One of the beautiful things about the Power O, is the ability to run it a multitude of different ways, and not change anything.  One of the most common variations of the play is the Power Read. Made popular by Auburn when they had Cam Newton, they made a living on this one variation.  Instead of kicking the defensive end with the fullback, the QB is now going to read the play side End. Either a guy in motion or the tail back will ride across the QB while the QB shuffles and reads towards the play side.  If the End squeezes he will simply give it to the speed back, and he will carry the ball to the perimeter on a jet sweep look.  If the End chases the speed back, the QB will keep and run ball behind the offensive line, which is running the Power O.  its simple, effective, and places the defense in a big bind.  Here are a few ways to run the play:

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With the prevalence of RPOs (run pass options) in today’s offensive world, it was only a matter of time before it was tagged alongside the Power O.  One of the easiest RPOs to pair with the play, is a slant by the slot.  If the LB plays run, the QB will pull and throw the slant.  If the LB sits, or drops, the QB will give.  Here is a look:

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One of my favorite variations, is also my go too variation when we have been hurting the defensive with Zone Lead.  The play is tagged with a “Kick” call. This simply tells the Guard and the FB to switch responsibilities.  The Guard will now kick out the edge defender and the FB will jab opposite to let the Guard clear, and then become the fit player. Here is the example:

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DRESSING IT UP

Power O can also be “dressed up” several different ways.  This is a term sometimes called “window dressings” as well.  It refers to making the play look different, but it’s actually the same.  Same but Different is an excellent way to conflict the defense.  One of the easiest ways to dress up the Power O, is with jet motion.  You can run the Power O with the jet fake or against the jet fake, depending on what you are trying to do to the defense. If you are trying to widen the edege defeder(s) then go with the motion. If you are trying to influence the Linebackers away from the play, then go against the motion.

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Shifting and jumping formations is very effective as well.  One of my favorites is to jump from unbalanced one way to unbalanced the other way.  The defense will be worried about lining up correctly and not stopping the play.  Here is a look at it:

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The TE will shift down to become the eligible tackle.  The Tackle, Z and X will all jump sides to set the unbalanced the opposite way. The key is to do it quickly and force the defense to scramble.  Eventually they will just start sliding the front, allowing you to attack weak personnel at your desire.

Down on the goalline you can dress it up out of a 3back, power-i look.  The 3back(z) will go outside to influence the edge defenders and become the alley blocker if the play happens to bounce.  Effective, and nothing changes for the rules of the play.

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CLOSING
the Power O is one of the most versatile and physical plays in football.  I firmly believe that every offense should run some facet of Power O, whether you are under center pro-i, wing-T or shot gun.  The fact that it can be run from all these different offenses clearly shows its merit.  It can give a physical component to any offense. It can be used as a counter to zone runs or it can be your staple play. The point is, the Power O has been here a long time, and I don’t see it every leaving the game of football.  Feel free to comment below. Please subscribe via email so you can get updated whenever I post a new article, and give me a follow on twitter at @thecoachvogt.